About Us

Economic Opportunity Act of 1964

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Economic Opportunity Act, giving birth to Community Action and the War on Poverty, with the sole purpose of promoting education, general welfare and health for the impoverished.

Our Promise

Community Action changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live.  We care about the entire community, and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.

Community Action Code of Ethics

What is Community Action?

Community Action Agencies are private non-profit or public organizations that were created by the federal government in 1964, as part of the Economic Opportunity Act, to prevent and reduce poverty by affording everyone the opportunity for education, training, and the chance to work and live in decency and dignity.

Community Action Agencies currently serve 96% of the counties across the United States. Each Community Action Agency is a locally controlled organization designed to respond to the specific human service needs of that community. As a result, every Community Action boasts different programs based on identified local needs.

Our Mission

Community Council of South Central Texas, Inc. is dedicated to empowering low-income families and individuals in South Central Texas by helping them transition out of poverty and become self-sufficient. The organization does this by providing comprehensive health, nutrition and social service programs that support families and individuals throughout the transition period.

Our Vision

Community Council of South Central Texas’ vision is to provide:

  • Immediate service
  • Service with necessary resources available
  • Service encompassing opportunities
  • Service that will change lives

Our Core Values

Integrity. We remain true to our mission, expect honesty among our staff, Board and the clients we serve and believe our actions help maintain the trust and confidence of the public.

Respect. We believe in treating others with dignity and respect, embrace the diversity of others and encourage staff to work together as a team.

Community Awareness. We believe in collaborating with other organizations throughout the community in an effort to complement existing resources to meet the needs of our clients, while also maximizing the support of our donors.

Empowerment. We believe in empowering our clients to become self-sufficient in order to live a better life, as well as empowering our employees to succeed in a culture based on trust, respect and commitment.

Responsibility, Accountability and Ethics. We take responsibility for achieving results and hold ourselves accountable for our actions. We strive to uphold the highest ethical standards, comply with all federal, state and local laws.

Our History

On May 11, 1965 the Community Council of Comal County was established as a private non–profit corporation, funded through the Office of Economic Opportunity. On September 3, 1965, the Articles of Incorporation were changed to reflect the addition of Blanco County to the service area and the name of the agency was changed to Community Council of Blanco and Comal Counties, Inc.  On March 25, 1971, the name of the corporation was again changed to the Community Council of South Central Texas, Inc. to conveniently allow for future expansion of the prescribed service area.

As the service delivery agency to the low-income, CCSCT will continue to identify needs, prioritize them, and stimulate, promote, secure, and use all available resources (federal, state, and local) to alleviate poverty. It is our intent to enable low-income individuals and families to acquire the skills and knowledge to secure the necessary opportunities to become fully self-sufficient.

CCSCT serves low-income families and individuals in 23 counties in South Central Texas. Those counties include: Atascosa, Bandera, Bee, Comal, Dimmit, Edwards, Frio, Gillespie, Guadalupe, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr, Kinney, LaSalle, Live Oak, Maverick, Medina, McMullen, Real, Uvalde, Val Verde, Wilson and Zavala. It should be noted that each program may be authorized by its funding source to serve either additional counties or less than the counties specified.